click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130224
20130224
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
of our operating revenue from membership dues f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be ab
if you have a question, we have to use this microphone here. so, you have to wait till you get the microphone in front of you to ask a question he. * lunch that's the purpose for the audio and stuff. today we're going to talk about -- basically this is what i want to do here. i've been a detective for about six years now and been with the police department 15 years. prior to that i was in the united states army, military police corps. any [speaker not understood] here? just one? prior to that when i went to college i was always looking at graffiti. i'm originally from wisconsin and there's a lot of gang graffiti back when i was growing up. i was interested in looking at it and seeing the messages that were up there. when i got into the phoenix police department, i worked four years on the road and then i started doing school resource officer. the school resource officer for a couple years where i really, really learned about graffiti. in your presentation, it talked about how the schools, schools are big where they start out, okay. [speaker not understood] at home, but school
we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
'd be surprised at what you can find and what you can get. the other thing that i use is two things that -- one of ours that we use in phoenix -- and again, this is one of the main reasons why people come to us is that gaolgraffiti hotline. our graffiti hotline program is almost like a silent witness. many are designed first to school age kids. any time we get grab eat aloe on the school we would take pictures up and put up a reward poster. we got a phoenix community alliance that has business members tire of graffiti that put money into this program. and we use it to reward people for calling others in on graffiti, up to $250. the point system, we go to a board once a month and talk about the different cases that we get and we reward these people up to $250. huge, great program in phoenix right now. lots -- and we don't just do it for conviction. you know what silent witness says? you can receive up to a thousand dollars upon conviction, not with the graffiti reward program. the graffiti hotline program, it's just minimum id of the tager because once we id them, we'll go and get them. sooner o
and west of our valley. where is he going? so, then, using facebook i found out where his girlfriend was and she lives in glendale. so, they take pictures and it goes on facebook and you do the longitude-latitude and you can get kind of close to where it was. well, just so happened that he tagged at 27th avenue in glendale, right on the glendale and phoenix border, we start today set up on him and found out where his girlfriend lived. we sat on the house and caught him, okay. after we arrested mod, broad him in, same thing. sat down and interviewed him for hours. and, man, they cry. you see that? once you start getting into their -- thing that helped me with mine and like i said, i'm not an expert, but if i can use -- if you can use something for me to help make your investigation successful, i don't start off with why did you do this, what did you do -- i start off nice and slow. tell me a little bit about yourself. it's like an interview, okay. and they tell you. you find something like jugs didn't have a dad. he said, i didn't have a dad to kick my ass to keep me right.
of a big differentiation factor in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to s
is war. everybody attack, all the gangs beating on us, now it's time we take back the hood. we're going to tag it up big and reclaim the store. my cousin coming strapped for back-up so if anything happens. >> hey, what's up, man? >> what y'all planning. >> we hit them back and we hit them hard. >> listen to me, all of you. go home. go home before you get yourselves killed. >> what are you talking about? >> can't you see what's going on in your own hood? you think we're going to let that happen? no, i'm not. >> come on, tibo, you're a leader. >> yeah, but i also want to (inaudible). >> i want to lead as many of these kids out of here as i can. >> we ain't playing no more, this is real. three of our kids are dead now. >> a coward would stay home and let you get shot over something stupid. >> go home and lead. the rest of us got work to do. >> you don't have to do this. you don't have to buy this kind of trouble. you can good a little further and do the right thing. >> what's that? >> i don't know, but it ain't this. this is negative. kids die young over this kind of stuff
be great. how do you go about securing funding for the various graffiti programs? do you use grants, tax assessments, et cetera? anybody? >> i think i can take that. >> okay, ready. >> for anyone who didn't attend my session, i do a juvenile program where i take kids who have been convicted of graffiti crimes to do community service on saturdays. the way i do this is get a public grant from department of public works where we take kids out to graffiti hot spots, we paint over graffiti and they get a reduced fine and credit for probation officers. this is done through a public grant. it's a very effective program. we have been able to turn a lot of kids around, restore justice. we get a lot of positive feedback from the community, a lot of other officers are happy to get the overtime. and as an officer, you're really able to facilitate the program well because you are able to put on a lot of different hats, communicate with probation, you communicate with traffic court judges, with community referral center, and with station personnel. so, you really act as a good communicator and facilit
and they would forget the part with their gang and they would paint over. they would use a roller and put stuff behind. we've done that. we've only walked away from it only because we haven't got what we consider the proper supervision to go out to be able to assess the environment and the young gangsters that go out on the paint crew, they respect the old veterans even if they've gotten reformed. they don't so much respect the city work [speaker not understood]. that's how it worked with us. >> okay, anybody else up there want to comment on that? i'm going to run over here because it's over here. had his hand up for a little while. if i could get you to stand up. >> this is a softball for dpw. i want to know where you get the funding that you give out as grant funding, let's say street smarts. is it general fund money, is there a special fee that's tied to something that goes into a fund? >> yeah, it's general fund money. the department makes a decision on programs and we earmark money for various, like the police and the arts commission and we earmark money and send it to them. a lot of times
they determine what is on the property is a nuisance and it allows us to keep our mural programs running. it allows us to look at individual situations. early on we had one situation where there was a property owner dispute between two neighbors where one had painted a sunflower on her garage and the other neighbor didn't like it. and the officer clearly made the distinction it was put on with permission. so, permission is considered in the decision-making process, but it's not an overall factor. so, if the by law officer had determined that that was a nuisance, the property owner would have been forced to remove it, but in this situation made a determination that it wasn't a nuisance, that it was put on, it wasn't detracting from the neighborhood and it was allowed to remain. it gives the officers a lot of leeway. we are looking at what toronto is doing right now in terms of possibly coming up with a way of retroactively approving pieces of art that are on murals that at this point in time our by laws seem to be holding. >> if i could just add to that, actually, because our program is s
. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have
basically with us. in terms of liability just to ensure that we don't have any problems with property owners in terms of painting, we ensure that we get $2 million of liability insurance. that blanketly coffers all of our volunteer program. that is a range to cover my program. iest mate how many volunteers i'm going to have per year and basically buy an insurance policy to cover that as well. in terms of safety i think martin can speak more to the issue of, you know, going into areas where there could be problems. edmonton overall is pretty safe community. we haven't really had any experience with people sort of being there present when we're painting over it. so, i can't really speak to that in terms of issues. but the liability issue is pretty well covered. i have a guide that's available on my website that outlines all of our forms and criteria that they go through and the property owners are also required to sign off a form giving the volunteer agency permission to paint their building. so, we're distancing ourselves from that so we don't have a problem. >> before i became a consul ant
's -- to me, it's almost like the vandals are laughing at us. >> larry, did you want to respond to that? >> yeah. so, we photograph all the tags and the inspectors go out and look at them. if the actual tack has been removed, then the graffiti is considered removed. the fact that the ghosting stays there, it becomes a very difficult thing at what level you're going to hold the property owner responsible. * tag for removing the ghosting. a lot of times that's not very easy to do and, so, are you still going to hold them accountable when they've made the effort, removed the initial tag? and they can't remove the ghost, i don't think so. as a city, i don't think that would be where i would want to be. if they showed they made the effort to remove it, unless it's extremely bad, i think they're doing their due diligence to try and remove the graffiti. >> all right, thank you. do you want to -- is that one red or is that -- because there was red and it was asked by the same person. >> it was red and then asked by the same person. >> you know what, i can see a bunch of hands up here. iv see t
artwork. so, in vancouver there is no active graffiti tag names, crew name used in our murals. we've come up with a fairly loose guideline which is being defined by a new graffiti programmer, program coordinator david over there. and they're coming up with some parameters so that the city can work with people that come from graffiti so that there is still some incentive for them to become artistic, to go into doing murals and other art. use their style, use that medium that they enjoy. but if they were to use active graffiti tax or names, we know from our experience of having 200 murals in vancouver it's going to attract graffiti. it's very likely going to have a negative effect on the artwork itself. so, we are building parameters around that and trying to work with the subculture, trying to work with those artists, but also understand graffiti is graffiti. our by law in vancouver states that even if you give an artist permission to put up graffiti on your wall, it has to go. they don't permit graffiti on your walls. whether that's in a mural or whether that's just a tag on your wall. so
. (applause) >> but we also have tremendous help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures. you should
's office. i personally want to thank zoom wynn who has been in that transition for us. she's a real delight to have work with in this time period. she's held the office together and i want to thank her permly for being here today. (applause) >> a great job. you know, it comes as no surprise probably for all of us that i've chosen carmen. carmen has been willing to step up to be the assessor. if you look at what she's done and has been at the helm of our budget committee and working with my office and all the financial entities, of course, truly representing the board at the budget office last couple years. we've done a tremendous amount of good work together and she's made that connection that i have often spoke about in working with the board together on the budgets and making sure we cover all the interests and needs. but also being very fiscally smart and brilliant in her efforts to help me do the first of two-year budgeting for the city, which is incredibly important. and i'll say later on why it means so much to rating agencies and others that we do even better fiscally. but at the sam
doing because she helps us with all of our fliers and everything that we need to do. john has been tireless. he comes to my house on fridays at 5:30 for meetings. he's a great, great supervisor and a champion for our district. and we're excited about this year. we're going to put in a park. we're going to do safety initiatives. we're looking for grant money for more beautification. if anybody is interested in starting a neighborhood watch and getting involved, call me and i can help you get started. it's a great thing to know your neighbors, even the ones who are a pain in the neck. it's a great thing to know your neighbors. [laughter] (applause) >> i would just like to say thank you to all of our neighbors because we have lived in that neighborhood for 37 years and it's just been such a joy to meet people who live right across the street and never knew what wonderful neighbors i had until we started the neighborhood watch group. so, i would strongly advise everyone to start a neighborhood watch group. it's great. and thanks to patricia, she's done an outstanding job and i'm so hap
and made of a different color brick. the building will be changed from office use to a mix of hotel, time share and residential units. that is the story on the old chronicle building. >> we have a question over here. hold on. >> when is it due to be complete? >> my guess is, i don't know for sure, but on the order of a year and a half from now. >> this is affordable housing? >> surprisingly what it did was generate the restoration of another landmark two blocks up designed by the reed brothers, all the affordable housing component will be two blocks up the street in a landmark building. >> when people do development, there is trade-off for affordable housing. it is not always within the ritz carlton itself. it can be relocated or paid into a fund and used another way. >> we will walk a block down this way down commission street. we are down here at the corner of third street and mission street. there is lots of construction going on. some old buildings. this is not necessarily a historic walking tour. this is to talk about buildings and earthquake issues. let me mention something more
in your city. there it is, a place for us to gather as nert members and there's our nert ics area. here is our structure. same kind of set up, sort of our version. command policy section, the planning group, they are up on top. then once things get rolling, you have your operations section, logistics section. here are our objectives on the nert team, figure out if it's big, if it's small, how do we keep track of what's going on? do we just remember it? are we going to rely on our computers, our pc's? no, we have to write it down the old-fashioned way. address, is there a fire, yes or no, damage, are there people injured, dead, can you get there. where, what, any sort of damage, are there people involved, can you get to it? here is a nert status sheet. basically if you send somebody out, you want to send the members' names, what time they went out, when they came back, what the assignment was, any comments, and if you have an incident number that would be nice. who is the safety person? we don't want to send people out, just hey, go do this. we want to keep track of it. if they don't com
and buena vista park is 88 awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughout the city to make san francisco one of the greatest places to live. the mayor's office of neighborhood services also known as mons focuses on neighborhood outreach and engagement. it is an honor to be here with community leaders who are dedicated to the same principles and are
or anybody else who wants to argue with us and say 90 percent of the observed graffiti we have in edmonton is text only. given all those options, that's what we're finding. so the other avenue that's important for us in terms of how i run my program is when i'm trying to promote a mural program or i'm trying to promote community support programs, it's really important for me to basically say that you can't cut the community portion of my program because 71 percent of the observed graffiti is on private property. only 10 percent of our graffiti in those neighborhoods was observed, was on city infrastructure. other government considered 19 percent and of that 97 percent was on canada post boxes like they are the drop boxes that the mail carriers use for picking up their mail to deliver. they are being phased out, though, so again within the next year or so, those boxes are going to be phased out in edmonton so we'll see if it makes a change in graffiti results. but it also assists us in terms of how we approach them. so we take this information to canada post and basically say, get rid
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
's bayview, that's potrero hill, visitacion valley, it's a little hollywood, it's dogpatch. it used to be the portola, half of it. my heart is still with you, but i'm glad like the speaker said, it is whole. and that is what's important, is that that neighborhood remains whole so that our city will be whole. you agree? [cheering and applauding] cheers >> so, a few years back there was this little idea to take back the bayview and really began to rewrite the history and the narrative that we often hear about in bayview. and it actually started, ironically, with a small little abandoned swath of land that has grown up to become the cuseda garden. and it's the thought child and the physical manifestation of hard work, of a few community leaders that got together and rolled up their sleeves and got to work. and tonight i have the honor to introduce one of the co-founders, his name is jeffery betcher. where are you? get up here. and jeff is going to introduce to you as he escorts ms. annette young smith to the stage. this lady, ladies and gentlemen, is a lifetime achievement award winner
for us and she won the contest for designing the logo for the conference. pretty nice design, i think. so, monica rose will be receiving an award for the designing of the logo. she designed the programs and she designed the brochures to promote the conference. and she's already said that she's on board donating it for the 2013 conference in phoenix. (applause) >> >> rick stanton nominated somebody. rick? * >> if you've been working in graffiti profession for awhile, i think everybody knows randy campbell. who knows randy campbell? that's good. those of you who don't, especially if you're in law enforce. you're probably going to want to write this down. no graph.net. randy campbell has been working in graffiti cases forever and he's a retired, i think, sheriff or highway patrolman. maybe somebody can help me out there. >> highway patrol. >> highway patrolman. what he runs it's no ground.net. for law enforcement, if you're looking for a tagger you think is crossing state boundaries and you catch one and you want to put up that person's tag to other law enforcement agencies, he's got a netwo
's stuff out there for the graffiti vandal because that can be of huge use to you. meetings, we hold a monthly task force meeting and our task force meeting pretty much covers everything from santa barbara down to san diego is our main group we have a task force meeting with. we share ideas, it's evolved over the years, become more formal. now each time we have a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for abo
. those are examples of on line mapping systems that can be used to find businesses or get driving directions or check on traffic conditions. all digital maps. >> gis is used in the city of san francisco to better support what departments do. >> you imagine all the various elements of a city including parcels and the critical infrastructure where the storm drains are. the city access like the traffic lights and fire hydrants. anything you is represent in a geo graphic space with be stored for retrieval and analysis. >> the department of public works they maintain what goes on in the right-of-way, looking to dig up the streets to put in a pipe. with the permit. with mapping you click on the map, click on the street and up will come up the nchgz that will help them make a decision. currently available is sf parcel the assessor's application. you can go to the assessor's website and bring up a map of san francisco you can search by address and get information about any place in san francisco. you can search by address and find incidents of crime in san francisco in the last 90 days
can come with me we will use black. >> we had a lot of changes in the graffiti unit. we do private property if someone moved we remove it and send it to the attorney's office and they take appropriate action. >> damage their property there. it's important to write the color in case they want to say what part of our house you abated the graffiti on. >> using your safety glasses the gloves. >> you got it. >> you know some places we gashi, people appreciate that. you know, a lot of timeses they say, thank you. >> the time where it's visible. a lot of people put it on the ground. >> i like when tourists come and say, you do this for your city and you get paid for that? >> we use the [inaudible] for the holes and the retaining walls. [inaudible]. white on the fire hydrants. fire box red for the fire boxes. our brown for the pg and e poles. >> we are not painters we do our best. >> i'm assuming it has to do with gang activity. >> if it's territorial i mind. >> in case it's gang related and they are marking our territory i would like to paint it over. >> anything with numbers
answers ready for us as far as the last time they saw us, after the show, oh, yeah, i'm not going to do this. >> every semester. and there's some schools that won't let us come in. it's really strange. oh, no, our kids don't do that. it's true. >> i've been in the show plenty of times, starting in 06 -- it was 06 -- and i've done this show numerous times. and don't get it twisted, yes, we are in sacramento and i have been staying in the good part of the city, you know what i mean? and three different bad parts of the city, we've gone to, probably, 6 schools in those bad cities and occasionally you get those, sometimes you see those kids that when they are coming into the cafeteria or the gym, multi purpose room, what have you, they are always like talking the whole time, you know? and still to this day i see like three of those kids from those kids that are not -- what can i say -- they are not that bad any more. they are not that bad. i see them, they are cool, they are not making no bad choices. they remember me. oh, i'm making right choices, i'm making right choices. it ma
and fresh in retreat from urban life and meanders under a canopy of oaks yup lipid u.s. and chill out in this pleasant
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)